Minerals & Gemstone 480x104
Minerals & Gemstone 480x104
 

American Museum of Natural History Visit: Part 3 - Individual Minerals 1

The American Museum of Natural History is known for many of its iconic minerals in its collection. I captured in photographs some important specimens of the collection in these next two posts, which feature individual minerals on display. I chose some of the museum's famous mineral specimens, as well as those that are highly photogenic or historically significant. 


Unfortunately, I was not able to get a good photograph of the Newmont Azurite. This specimen, a giant Azurite from Bisbee, Arizona, is among the most famous minerals of the collection (and the world). While exceptionally aesthetic, it is very hard to capture on camera from within its display case. Another famous mineral I did not see is the Subway Garnet, a very large, well-formed Almandine Garnet found in 1885 in Midtown Manhattan during a sewer excavation. This mineral is not on display but in the museum's repository, and I was therefore unable to see it. However, I was happy to hear that it will be showcased on display when the museum completes its current renovation, scheduled for 2020.


Despite missing some key mineral specimens, I was able to capture many other important specimens, and feature them in this and the following post.


Elbaite Tourmaline with Quartz from Pala, California
Elbaite Tourmaline with Quartz from Pala, California

Stibiconite Pseudomorph after Stibnite from San Luis Potosi,
 Mexico
Stibiconite Pseudomorph after Stibnite from San Luis Potosi, Mexico

Large Epidote Crystals from Untersulzbach, Tyrol, Austria
Large Epidote Crystals from Untersulzbach, Tyrol, Austria

Calcite Crystals with Red Hematite Staining from Egremont, England
Calcite Crystals with Red Hematite Staining from Egremont, England

Giant Topaz Crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Giant Topaz Crystal from Minas Gerais, Brazil

Sulfur Crystals from Cianciana, Sicily, Italy
Sulfur Crystals from Cianciana, Sicily, Italy

Hematite Kidney Ore from Cumbria, England
Hematite "Kidney Ore" from Cumbria, England

Red Mushroom Elbaite Tourmaline from Mogok, Burma
Red Mushroom Elbaite Tourmaline from Mogok, Burma

Giant Calcite Crystals from Joplin, Missouri
Giant Calcite Crystals from Joplin, Missouri

Sulfur Crystals from Cianciana, Sicily, Italy
Sulfur Crystals from Cianciana, Sicily, Italy

Pink Apophyllite from St. Andreasberg, Germany
Pink Apophyllite from St. Andreasberg, Germany

Phosphophyllite from Bolivia
Phosphophyllite from Bolivia

Stolzite from Broken Hill, NSW, Australia
Stolzite from Broken Hill, NSW, Australia

Calcite Crystals from Joplin, Missouri
Calcite Crystals from Joplin, Missouri

Hemimorphite from Joplin, Missouri
Hemimorphite from Joplin, Missouri

American Museum of Natural History Visit: Part 4 - Individual Minerals 2

This post is a continuation of the previous one, showcasing some of the outstanding minerals in the collection of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. The museum contains thousands of exceptional minerals on display, and it was difficult to choose which ones should be added to these posts, as I took many good photos of many good minerals. I'll save more for my next visit when the museum reopens the mineral exhibit in 2020. In the meantime, enjoy these current photos for now.


Harmotome from Dunbarton, Scotland
Harmotome from Dunbarton, Scotland

Malachite Fingers from Bisbee, Arizona
Malachite Fingers from Bisbee, Arizona

Wulfenite from Hillsboro, New Mexico
Wulfenite from Hillsboro, New Mexico

Multicolored Fluorite from Elizabethtown, Illinois
Multicolored Fluorite from Elizabethtown, Illinois

Scolecite on Stilbite from Nasik, India
Scolecite on Stilbite from Nasik, India

Rutile Twin from Parkersburg, Pennsylvania
Rutile Twin from Parkersburg, Pennsylvania

Sulfur Barrel Crystal from Cianciana, Italy
Sulfur Barrel Crystal from Cianciana, Italy

Scorodite from Zacatecas, Mexico
Scorodite from Zacatecas, Mexico

Calcite with Copper Inclusions from Lake Superior, off the Michigan Coast
Calcite with Copper Inclusions from Lake Superior, off the Michigan Coast

Wurtzite from Mies, Czech Republic
Wurtzite from Mies, Czech Republic

Large Almandine Garnet from Manhattan Island, New York City
Large Almandine Garnet from Manhattan Island, New York City

Purple Apatite from Auburn, Maine
Purple Apatite from Auburn, Maine

Exceptionally Large Legrandite from Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
Exceptionally Large Legrandite from Mapimi, Durango, Mexico

The Worlds Largest Stibnite on Display, from Wuling, China
The World's Largest Stibnite on Display, from Wuling, China

Elbaite Tourmaline with Quartz from Pala, California
Gold Leaf Formation from the Red Ledge Mine, Washington, Nevada

American Museum of Natural History Visit: Part 5 - Morgan Hall of Gems

The Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems in the American Museum of Natural History is a room within the museum mineral hall filled with both natural and cut gemstones. There are many famous gemstones in the collection. The Star of India, one of the centerpieces of the hall, is a 563 carat Star Sapphire, one of the largest such gems in the world. The DeLong Star Ruby is a 100 carat Star Ruby with bright color and strong asterism. The Patricia Emerald is a very large iconic Colombian Emerald crystal at 632 carats. These highlights are but a fraction of the gemstones in the vast collection, with many additional outstanding pieces on display.


According to the museum website, the hall of gemstones, which closed in October this year, is scheduled to reopen in the fall of 2019 after extensive renovations, as the Allison and Roberto Mignone Halls of Gems and Minerals.


Multicolored Faceted Sapphire Gemstones, with a large Padparadschah in the Top Center
Multicolored Faceted Sapphire Gemstones, with a large Padparadschah in the Top Center

Ruby Crystals from from Afghanistan and Myanmar (Burma)
Ruby Crystals from Afghanistan and Myanmar (Burma)

The Famous Patrica Emerald
The Famous Patrica Emerald

Harmotome from Dunbarton, Scotland
The Star of India, a Superb Star Sapphire

The Midnight Star, a Purple Star Sapphire (Top), and DeLong Star Ruby (bottom)
The Midnight Star, a Purple Star Sapphire (Top), and DeLong Star Ruby (bottom)

Large Cats Eye Chrysoberyl from Sri Lanka (85 Carats)
Large Cat's Eye Chrysoberyl from Sri Lanka (85 Carats)

Diamond%} Crystals in Conglomerate Matrix from Minas Gerais, Brazil
Diamond Crystals in Conglomerate Matrix from Minas Gerais, Brazil

Another Diamond in Conglomerate Matrix from Brazil. (Can you find the Diamond?)
Another Diamond in Conglomerate Matrix from Brazil. (Can you find the Diamond?)

Diamond in Kimberlite Matrix from the Mir Pipe, Russia
Diamond in Kimberlite Matrix from the Mir Pipe, Russia

Diamond in Kimberlite Matrix from Kimberley, South Africa
Diamond in Kimberlite Matrix from Kimberley, South Africa

Exhibit Case of Quartz Gemstones
Exhibit Case of Quartz Gemstones

Exhibit Case of Tourmaline Gemstones
Exhibit Case of Tourmaline Gemstones

American Museum of Natural History Visit: Part 6 - New Jersey Traprocks

The American Museum of Natural History has some important minerals on display from the nearby volcanic traprock quarries of northeastern New Jersey. There is an exhibit case dedicated to these minerals, as well as sporadic representation of New Jersey traprock minerals in other cases. Many of the labels list the locality as "West Paterson," presumably referring to the Upper New Street Quarry, which is in fact in Paterson, and not West Paterson. Nevertheless, in our caption, we kept the "West Paterson" designation when used for lack of certainty.


The display case for the North Jersey traprock minerals has a plaque that states the following:
"A unique collection of minerals, resulting from volcanic activity, exists less than 20 miles west of New York City. Near Paterson, New Jersey, where lava flows had hardened into basalt, many of the fissures, vesicles, and other openings in the basaltic rock were filled or coated with a distinct assemblage of minerals. These include a range of related minerals known as the zeolites - Chabazite, Heulandite, Mesolite, Stilbite, and others. Attractive minerals such as Prehnite, Datolite, Pectolite, and Apophyllite are also present along with the zeolites. Because crushed basalt is a valuable rock for construction, many quarries once operated in the basaltic rock of northern New Jersey. Some of the minerals they uncovered, which number more than 60, can be seen here."


Main Case of Volcanic Minerals from the Paterson Area, New Jersey
Primary Case of Volcanic Traprock Minerals from the Paterson Area, New Jersey

Prehnite from Paterson, NJ
Prehnite from Paterson, NJ

{homsonite from Paterson, NJ
Thomsonite from Paterson, NJ

Thaumasite from Paterson, NJ
Thaumasite from Paterson, NJ

Pectolite from West Paterson, NJ
Pectolite from West Paterson, NJ

Prehnite from West Paterson, NJ
Prehnite from West Paterson, NJ

Chabazite from West Paterson, NJ
Chabazite from West Paterson, NJ

Quartz Cast after Anhydrite from West Paterson, NJ
Quartz Cast after Anhydrite from West Paterson, NJ

Stilbite from West Paterson, NJ
Stilbite from West Paterson, NJ

Chalcopyrite on Pectolite from Bergen Hill, NJ
Chalcopyrite on Pectolite from Bergen Hill, NJ

Barite from Prospect Park, NJ
Barite from Prospect Park, NJ

Thomsonite with Prehnite from Paterson, NJ
Thomsonite with Prehnite from Paterson, NJ

Analcime with Prehnite from Paterson, NJ
Analcime with Prehnite from Paterson, NJ

Large Prehnite from Paterson, NJ
Large Prehnite from Paterson, NJ

Apophyllite from Great Notch, NJ
Apophyllite from Great Notch, NJ

American Museum of Natural History Visit: Part 7 - Franklin NJ Minerals

Franklin, New Jersey, is an old mining district that lies about 40 miles northwest of Manhattan. Its fame lies in its rich deposits of zinc, exploited through the 1950's. The Franklin Mine is world-famous for being the most proficient source of fluorescent minerals, and is known as the fluorescent capital of the world. It also has produced over 300 known minerals, one of the largest mineral counts for a single locality. Nearby, in the borough of Ogdensburg, is a continuation of the same ore vein, with the same assemblage of minerals. Both Franklin and Ogdensburg have produced very important mineral specimens, with old classics such as Rhodonite and Willemite within the cases of museums throughout the world. The American Museum of Natural History is no exception, having a special affinity to these locations due to their proximity.

Presented below are some of the minerals on display from Franklin and Ogdensburg, New Jersey. This post concludes our museum report on the American Museum of Natural History. However, visit our Instagram page for additional photos not included on these pages.


Franklinite in Calcite from Franklin, NJ
Franklinite in Calcite from Franklin, NJ

Hemimorphite from Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, NJ
Hemimorphite from Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, NJ

Barrel-Shaped Molybdenite Crystal from Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, NJ
Barrel-Shaped Molybdenite Crystal from Sterling Hill, Ogdensburg, NJ

Rhodonite%} from Franklin, NJ
Rhodonite from Franklin, NJ

Franklinite with Willemite from Franklin, NJ
Franklinite with Willemite from Franklin, NJ

Zincite Crystals from Franklin, NJ
Zincite Crystals from Franklin, NJ

Radiating Willemite from Franklin, NJ
Radiating Willemite from Franklin, NJ

Native Copper from Franklin, NJ
Native Copper from Franklin, NJ

Axinite from Paterson, NJ
Axinite from Franklin, NJ

Zincite, Odd Formation, from Franklin, NJ
Zincite, Odd Formation, from Franklin, NJ