Minerals & Gemstone 480x104
Minerals & Gemstone 480x104
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Minerals of the Midwest: Special Tucson Edition Post



In recognition of the 2017 Tucson Gem and Mineral Show®, we are proud to present "Minerals of the Midwest," a compilation of photos of some of the most well-known mineral types from the Midwestern United States. "Minerals of the Midwest" is the theme this year at the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show®, which will feature public showcase exhibits of some of the finest Midwest minerals of the world from museums and private collections.
"Midwest" is a broadly defined term. The show organizers have incorporated a loose definition of the Midwest to include the following states: Arkansas, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.
A special thank you goes to John Betts for supplying the exceptional photos for this compilation.



Barite
Elk Creek, South Dakota



Barite "Desert Rose"
Norman, Oklahoma



Calcite
Elmwood Mine,
Tennessee



Calcite
Joplin,
Missouri



Calcite
North Vernon,
Indiana



Calcite with Sand Inclusions
Rattlesnake Butte
South Dakota



Calcite
Sweetwater Mine,
Missouri



Celestine
Portage,
Ohio



Chalcocite
Flambeau Mine,
Ladysmith, Wisconsin



Chalcopyrite (oxidized)
Sweetwater Mine
Missouri



Copper
Calumet,
Keweenaw Peninsula,
Michigan



Diamond (macle)
Murfreesboro,
Arkansas



Fluorite
Annabel Lee-Mine
Illinois



Fluorite
Cave-in-Rock,
illinois



Fluorite
Elmwood Mine
Tennessee



Galena
Douglas,
Tri-State District,
Kansas



Gypsum (Selenite)
with sand inclusions
Jet, Oklahoma



Millerite in Geode
Hall's Gap, Kentucky



Quartz & Calcite
in Geode
Keokuk
Iowa



Quartz
Mt. Ida, Arkansas



Wavellite
Dug Hill,
Avant
Arkansas



Witherite
Rosiclare,
Illinois



Remainder Carbonates in our System Completed

We completed rewriting all of the remainder carbonate minerals in our guide. This involved a complete rewrite on all aspects of the minerals with newer information and a better writing style. We have also added larger 3D crystals and have added many new images of additional mineral habits. Here is a list of the additional updated minerals:

Rewriting of the Carbonates

We have undertaken the task of rewriting all the carbonate minerals in our guide. The content was written many years ago, and will benefit from a complete overhaul, including updated introduction details, locality information, and larger 3D crystal sketches. We are also adding many additional pictures to each mineral we go through.

We started first with the Calcite group, with the following mineral now completed:

Nitrate Minerals Added

The nitrates group of minerals are seldom represented in collections, and they generally do not make good mineral specimens. Nevertheless, we wanted our guide to have a representation of all the groups of minerals, hence we included these minerals. Futher, the nitrates have been economically important and are therefore known for their industrial applications.
 

Here are the new nitrate minerals we added: